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Effects of Different Feed Condiments on the Performance of Piglets in the Nursing Period*

日期
2019年2月26日 17:27
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ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of different types of feed condiments on the growth performance of piglets during the incubation period. Ninety-six Du-Chang ternary hybrid piglets (half male and half female) with an average weight of 16.4 (+0.13 kg) were randomly divided into four treatments, three replicates per treatment and eight piglets per replicate. The treatment was divided into control group (basic diet), experimental group I (basic diet + A flavoring agent 500g/t + B flavoring agent 150 g/t), experimental group II (basic diet + C 120g/t), experimental group III (basic diet + A 500g/t + B 150g/t + C 120g/t), in which A was milk flavoring agent, B was saccharin sodium sweetener, and C was flavoring agent for improving intestinal function (mainly natural plant extract). 。 The results showed that: (1) Flavoring agents and sweeteners could significantly increase the average intake of animals (p < 0.05), but there was no significant difference in the average daily gain and feed-meat ratio (p > 0.05). (2) Condiments for improving gastrointestinal function could significantly increase the average feed intake of piglets at the conservation stage (p < 0.01), but had no significant effect on daily gain and feed-meat ratio (p > 0.05). (3) Compared with common flavoring agents and saccharin sodium sweeteners, the compound use of flavoring agents to improve gastrointestinal function can increase the intake of animals, but the difference is not significant (p > 0.05).

Key words: intestinal attractant; aroma agent; sweetener; piglet; production performance

In recent years, insufficient feed intake has become a key factor restricting the performance of pig production. [1], many feed enterprises want to improve palatability of feed and increase the intake of animal, but this is a problem that puzzles everyone today when raw material prices are soaring and constantly looking for new alternative materials. The most commonly used feed flavoring agents are fragrances and sweeteners. They promote the intake of pigs from the stimulation of smell and taste. As for endogenous attractants, such as orexin, leptin and other [2-4], there are similar studies both at home and abroad, but the technology is not very mature, and many things are still being explored. This article mainly discusses the difference between endogenous flavoring agents and conventional feed seasonings for improving intestinal function and whether there is certain interaction between them. It provides a theoretical basis for improving palatability of pig diets.

1. Materials and methods

1.1 Test Design

In this experiment, a single factor experiment design was adopted. 96 pigs (male and female half) of 16.4 + 0.13kg of Duchang three yuan were randomly divided into 4 treatments, 3 repetitions for each treatment and 8 pigs for each replicate. The treatment was divided into control group (basic diet), experimental group I (basic diet + A flavoring agent 500g/t + B flavoring agent 150 g/t), experimental group II (basic diet + C 120g/t), experimental group III (basic diet + A 500g/t + B 150g/t + C 120g/t), in which A was milk flavoring agent, B was sugar concentrate sodium sweetener, and C was functional feed flavoring agent (mainly natural plant extract). Extracts and yeast fermentation products.

1.2 Test Method

The experimental group was weighed by ear tag and fasting in the morning. The experimental group was grouped according to the fasting weight (requiring that the average weight of each repetition was basically the same, P > 0.05). The initial feeding period was 3 days. After the end of the feeding, the initial weight was first fasting in the morning. According to the initial weight, the pigs were adjusted again to ensure that the weight of each replicate remained the same, and there was no significant difference. Then a formal trial was conducted, and the trial lasted for 28 days.

1.3 Days Food Composition

NRC (2012) feeding standard was adopted in the design of piglet diet. The basic diet formula is shown in the table below.*

1.4 Measuring Indicators

Average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI) and feed to meat ratio (F/G) at each stage. Each piglet was weighed on the 1st, 15th and 29th days of the experiment, and the average daily gain (ADG) of each stage was calculated. The material was broken 12 hours before weighing. The feed supply was recorded daily, the total feed intake was calculated weekly, and the average daily feed intake (ADFI) of each stage was calculated. Feed conversion rate (F/G) was calculated based on weight gain and total feed intake at each stage.

1.5 Statistical Analysis of Data

One-way ANOVA method of SPSS11.5 software was used to analyze variance, and Duncan's multiple comparisons were made after significant differences. The statistical difference was significant (p < 0.05), and the statistical difference was extremely significant (p < 0.01). The test results were expressed as "average (+standard deviation)".

2. Result analysis

The weight gain ratios of ADFI, ADG and F/G feed in each stage and the whole period of the trial period are shown in Table 3.

2.1 Effects of Different Feed Condiments on ADFI in Piglets

From Table 3 and Figure 1, we can see that the average daily intake of group C and D in the 1-14, 15-28 and the whole test period was significantly higher than that of the control group (p < 0.05). There was a significant difference between group C and group A (p < 0.01). The average daily intake of the whole test period was 9.4% higher than that of group A. The average daily intake of group B and group D was 5.6% and 7.5% higher than that of group A, respectively. Significant (p < 0.05); therefore, the addition of food attractants can improve the palatability of the diet and increase the intake. The intake of group C was slightly higher than that of group D, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05), so there was not necessarily a superposition effect between different types of attractants.

2.2 Effects of Different Feed Condiments on ADG

From the daily average weight gain, compared with the control group, the ADG of the experimental group B, C and D increased in varying degrees in 1-14 days, 15-28 days and the whole period, but the difference was not significant (p > 0.05). In the whole experimental period (0-28 days), the ADG ratio of the group added intestinal flavoring agent 120 g/T was higher than that of the control group.